The Incredibles 2 Review – Maybe Just Rewatch the First One Instead?

the-incredibles.jpgThe Incredibles 2 opens with a short introduction from multiple people involved in making of the movie. Director Brad Bird, as well as most of the main cast, assures us that they have taken their time with this film and that it will be well worth the 14 year wait since the first movie. This is a weird decision, as nobody in the theater needs to be sold on Pixar’s pedigree or the prospect of watching an Incredibles sequel. It is an even stranger thing to do when the product you have made is not particularly good, as is the case with The Incredibles 2.  Bird and Co. have made Incredibles 2: Incredibles Harder, a sequel in the repetitious and unnecessary mold of Die Hard 2. Unlike the second Die Hard film, that can’t use “we wanted to fast track this one to capitalize on the popularity of the first” as a justification for making an underwhelming retread of the first movie because, as Samuel L. Jackson told me just before the film started, it is a labour of love that has been worked on for 14 years.

The first Incredibles ends with each family member assuredly looking at one another as the Underminer (John Ratzenberger) emerges, each knowing exactly what to expect from the other. They strike a team pose while framed in a wide shot, visually conveying that they have learned to work together as a cohesive unit. This is a great ending because we see how far they have come from their frustrated squabbling and inability to get one the same page as one another early on in the film. Bafflingly, The Incredibles 2 begins by undercutting the exceptionally well realized character development that we saw in the first movie. Picking up immediately from where the last one left off, the family has instantly regressed from a functional unit back to the squabbling, perpetually frustrated individuals we met at the before they went to Syndrome’s Island.

This shift back to a familiar status quo is followed through on with tenacity, as the film has the same basic plot as the first movie. Elastigirl (Holly Hunter) and Mr. Incredible (Craig T. Nelson) have switched places but we are nevertheless watching one of them prioritize heroism over family while doing hero work for mysterious benefactors while the other is confined to domesticity in the interim. Violet (Sarah Vowell) is once again after the affections of her generic teen heartthrob love interest from the last movie (due to a strange contrivance she is even pursuing a date with him in this movie despite getting one at the end of the last film). Of course, there is also Dash (Huck Miner) who…wait, they didn’t actually give Dash anything to do this time.

It would be one thing to do the same movie again but the shame of it is that Bird is doing everything so much worse this time around. Bird dealt with Bob’s secret superhero time with an incredibly effective montage, which served to limit the amount of time that the family spent apart and kept things moving at a steady pace. The pacing in this film is so much worse, as Bird has just opted to make two concordant movies about Elastigirl’s superheroics and the rest of the family respectively and then shuffle them together in the edit. To add insult to injury, the Mr. Incredible half of the movie ends up being hugely inconsequential in the grand scheme of things.  The movie drops his obnoxious arc about being jealous of Elastigirl with no clear resolution, so the audience can’t help but wonder why the filmmakers spent so much time on it. At least, the Elastigirl stuff fairs better, with a number of well directed action scenes injecting some much-needed life into the proceedings.

Bottom line: Incredibles 2 is bottom shelf Pixar that does nothing to justify its existence. The plotting isn’t as tight, it’s not as much fun and it mostly feels like a now-or-never cash grab on the part of the filmmakers. I rewatched the first movie immediately before seeing this one and it holds up like nobody’s business. Just go watch that movie instead, you’ll almost certainly be glad you did.

 

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